LYMPH-NODE-plush_MThink you know a lot about the lymphatic system, or the anatomy of a lymph node? Prove it.  Answers below. 1. How does stuff flow through the lymphatic system? A) Lymph Pump B) Gravity C) Pressure from the arteries pumping next to it 2. What are lymph cells called? A) Erythrocytes B) Lymphocytes C) Lymphytes D) Hepatocytes 3. What happens at a germinal center? A) Bacteria are destroyed B) Lymph is filtered C) Mature B Lymphocytes multiply 4. What filters the lymph? A) Macrophages B) Leucocytes C) Tonsils D) Spleen 5. Is the lymphatic system connected to the circulatory system? A) Yes B) No Answers: 1/C, 2/B, 3/C, 4/A, 5/A
TonsilStones2Do you know what tonsil stones are? Technically, they're called tonsilloliths, and are made up of  bacteria, dead cells, mucus, and other junk that can collect in the grooves of the tonsils. This buildup can happen due to stress, but the most common reason is tonsillitis (inflammation of the tonsils). The tonsils are supposed to trap bacteria and foreign stuff, but when they are inflamed, they are puffier. This puffiness can cause grooves in the tonsils to close up, which means any bacteria or foreign stuff would get trapped, until it's big enough to poke out of the groove. That's when you see them and get grossed out!
IntestinesVsGluten This month is Celiac Disease Awareness Month. Chances are, if you don't have the disease, you don't know much about it (unless you work in the health field). So to understand Celiac disease, we first have to know what a little thing called gluten is. Gluten is a protein in grains like wheat, oats, barley, and rye. It means "glue" in Latin, because it holds bread together and gives dough its stickiness. Different grains have different amounts of gluten; the more gluten, the chewier it makes your baked goods. For example, the flour used for bagels and pizza has more gluten than the flours used in light, crumbly pastries. So what does gluten have to do with Celiac disease? If gluten goes into the small intestine of someone with the disease, it causes an immune system reaction. This means gas, bloating, etc. "True celiacs" will have these reactions even if they eat a small amount of gluten. Other people may just be sensitive to gluten and need to eat less of it. More about Celiac disease here.  
AccessorySpleen2 How much do you know about your spleen? Here are some weird and wacky facts that might have you thanking your spleen for what it does. 10% of people have an extra, tiny spleen next to their regularly-sized one, and it's considered normal. Splenomegaly is the technical name for an enlarged spleen. Where the spleen hangs out: Under the left side of your ribcage. Spleens are actually more purple than red (and they're definitely not green)! Spleens do not regenerate, but livers can! The spleen also gets rid of old red blood cells. Here's how: when blood cells get old, they get stiff; the spleen has tiny channels called blood capillaries. These are too small for old, stiff blood cells to get through, so they get caught. Then the white blood cells in the spleen break down the old red blood cells. Know any more cool facts about spleens? Comment below!