UnderYourSkinEver wondered how your skin senses temperature? Do you know all the layers of the skin? Take our quiz & then check your answers below! 1. Thick skin, like the soles of your feet, has an extra layer of skin; what's it called? A) Stratum Spinosum B) Stratum Lucidum C) Stratum Basale D) Stratum Granulosum 2. How does your skin know you're holding that hot cup of coffee? A) Fur B) My eyeballs can see the steam  C) Organs of Ruffini D) Merkel's Disks 3. What muscle causes goosebumps? A) Deltoid B) Masseter C) Arrector Pili D) Sternocleido-mastoid 4.  Is the Stratum Corneum part of the Epidermis, Dermis or Hypodermis?  A) Epidermis B) Dermis C) Hypodermis 5. The epidermis has 5 layers; what is the bottom one called? A) Stratum Lucidum B) Stratum Granulosum C) Stratum Basale D) Stratum Corneum Answers: 1/B, 2/C, 3/C, 4/A, 5/C  
PinealMelatonin Pop quiz! What does your pineal gland do? Most people know it as a little blob in your brain that makes melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that's made when it gets dark outside. Your eye has  really cool photoreceptor cells that sense light, so it can tell the brain (and pineal gland) that it's time to start making melatonin. Melatonin makes you sleepy and lowers your body's temperature. Have you ever taken a trip to a different time zone? Even a change of one hour can be annoying, right? It's because your body already has an established "sleep/wake cycle." That means you will still get sleepy at the same time, but the daylight (or darkness) outside will not agree with you! Your body is used to making melatonin at similar times every day, so even if you fly halfway across the globe (a 12 hour difference), you will have jetlag: aka a hard time staying awake during a bright, sunny day! There's more. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants keep cells from being damaged by free radicals. Read more about antioxidants and free radicals here!