The pineal is a teeny endocrine gland deep inside your brain🧠 that modulates sleep-wake and seasonal cycles! Melatonin is the sleepy substance 💤 that regulates circadian rhythms and gets you to bed. Descartes thought the pineal was the seat of the human soul. The gland is also thought to be the third eye 👁and is named for its pine cone-like shape. If you need a bed buddy, check out our sleep-inducing brand new pineal plush!

Human Hormones - List of All HormonesHumans make and circulate over 50 hormones, thanks to your  amazing endocrine network of glands. Hormones travel through the blood to help different organs talk to each other. The pea-sized pituitary gland, located in the brain, controls the release of seven different hormones that regulate sex drive, hunger and growth. Credit to the Word Cloud Generator for generating this graphic.
PinealMelatonin Pop quiz! What does your pineal gland do? Most people know it as a little blob in your brain that makes melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that's made when it gets dark outside. Your eye has  really cool photoreceptor cells that sense light, so it can tell the brain (and pineal gland) that it's time to start making melatonin. Melatonin makes you sleepy and lowers your body's temperature. Have you ever taken a trip to a different time zone? Even a change of one hour can be annoying, right? It's because your body already has an established "sleep/wake cycle." That means you will still get sleepy at the same time, but the daylight (or darkness) outside will not agree with you! Your body is used to making melatonin at similar times every day, so even if you fly halfway across the globe (a 12 hour difference), you will have jetlag: aka a hard time staying awake during a bright, sunny day! There's more. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants keep cells from being damaged by free radicals. Read more about antioxidants and free radicals here!
The pineal gland may be small, but it looms large in the minds of literary types. Did you know the pineal gland was a source of fascination to philosophers like Descartes, who called it the "seat of the soul"? The pineal gland captured the imagination of authors like Hunter S. Thompson, whose character Dr. Gonzo feared the psychoactive properties of pineal gland extract in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. "Man, I'll try just about anything, but I'd never in hell touch a pineal gland," Dr. Gonzo said in the movie version of the book. In his novel Broom of the System, David Foster Wallace's fictional corporation Stonecipheco worked on putting a pineal additive in baby food. More pop culture pineal stuff here.