What Does the Pineal Gland Do?What the heck is a pineal gland and what does it do? So glad you asked! The pineal gland is a magical friend deep inside your brain that releases melatonin, which helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle.

Pineal Gland in the Brain

What's extra cool about the pineal gland? Even though it's deep inside your brain, it can detect light and knows the difference between day and night. How? Because light travels through the eyeballs, goes inside your brain where the pineal gland can "see" the light! Isn't that amazing? This magical melatonin gland was believed to be the third eye and the seat of the soul by many people, including philosopher Descartes. Learn more about the pineal gland on our YouTube channel! Sweet dreams.

The pineal is a teeny endocrine gland deep inside your brain🧠 that modulates sleep-wake and seasonal cycles! Melatonin is the sleepy substance 💤 that regulates circadian rhythms and gets you to bed. Descartes thought the pineal was the seat of the human soul. The gland is also thought to be the third eye 👁and is named for its pine cone-like shape. If you need a bed buddy, check out our sleep-inducing brand new pineal plush!

Human Hormones - List of All HormonesHumans make and circulate over 50 hormones, thanks to your  amazing endocrine network of glands. Hormones travel through the blood to help different organs talk to each other. The pea-sized pituitary gland, located in the brain, controls the release of seven different hormones that regulate sex drive, hunger and growth. Credit to the Word Cloud Generator for generating this graphic.
PinealMelatonin Pop quiz! What does your pineal gland do? Most people know it as a little blob in your brain that makes melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone that's made when it gets dark outside. Your eye has  really cool photoreceptor cells that sense light, so it can tell the brain (and pineal gland) that it's time to start making melatonin. Melatonin makes you sleepy and lowers your body's temperature. Have you ever taken a trip to a different time zone? Even a change of one hour can be annoying, right? It's because your body already has an established "sleep/wake cycle." That means you will still get sleepy at the same time, but the daylight (or darkness) outside will not agree with you! Your body is used to making melatonin at similar times every day, so even if you fly halfway across the globe (a 12 hour difference), you will have jetlag: aka a hard time staying awake during a bright, sunny day! There's more. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants keep cells from being damaged by free radicals. Read more about antioxidants and free radicals here!