Blood Mug - Blood Donor Gift - Phlebotomist Gift - Blood Gift - Phlebotomy GiftKeep 'em guessing about what you're drinking. Throw some high-octane coffee in our cute new blood mug, toss in some red food coloring and maybe you can freak out your phlebotomist friends. Did you know what MGUS is an acronym for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance --  a condition when abnormal proteins are found in the blood? Get your MGUS MUGS here.
Uterus Swimming in BloodOur uterus plush FINALLY is back in stock and ready for anything! Get your fresh uterus plush right here.
BoneThugsIt's the kind of question that our mothers harass us with. When we voice our answer, doctors stare at us disapprovingly. This is also the reason we avoid dietitians, or outright lie to nurses and grandmothers. When you're old, you won't want to move much anyway, right? What am I talking about? Calcium! It's National Osteoporosis Day, so in the spirit I calculated yesterday's calcium intake: Almost Zero (you know, if you count a piece of cake or 2 miscellaneous eggs). As much as I'd like to ignore this and pretend I get plenty of calcium, I don't want to have a hunchback at 60 years old. My great aunt is 90 and still travels the world! Talk about inspiring. So how do you get more calcium? And not just in your diet - how do you make sure it gets into your bones and stays there, after you're old and prone to falling from natural declines in your sense of balance? I'll give you a hint: dairy doesn't make your bones any less frail. So what are good sources of calcium, then? Click the link, or read on: leafy greens (especially kale), nuts (almonds!), seeds, soy, and white beans. See Whole Food's list for more ideas. Exercise is also great for strengthening bones, but it needs to be weight-bearing, like these workout ideas (floating in the pool doesn't count). Try yoga, running, or dancing! Do you have any favorite workouts or calcium-rich recipes?  
AccessorySpleen2 How much do you know about your spleen? Here are some weird and wacky facts that might have you thanking your spleen for what it does. 10% of people have an extra, tiny spleen next to their regularly-sized one, and it's considered normal. Splenomegaly is the technical name for an enlarged spleen. Where the spleen hangs out: Under the left side of your ribcage. Spleens are actually more purple than red (and they're definitely not green)! Spleens do not regenerate, but livers can! The spleen also gets rid of old red blood cells. Here's how: when blood cells get old, they get stiff; the spleen has tiny channels called blood capillaries. These are too small for old, stiff blood cells to get through, so they get caught. Then the white blood cells in the spleen break down the old red blood cells. Know any more cool facts about spleens? Comment below!